Communication

Drive home your main point

February 1, 2009
In the midst of your speech, you sense that most of your audience is daydreaming. What gives?

Move past petty differences

February 1, 2009
Tensions can flare in any workplace. You must make sure raw emotion doesn’t affect employees’ performance.

Reap the power of the pause

February 1, 2009
The French phrase “the spirit of the stairs” (esprit d’escalier) refers to our tendency to belatedly think of a witty answer to someone’s comment. We’re heading down the stairs when we realize what we should have said.

Confront reality, even if it’s ugly

February 1, 2009
In times of economic uncertainty, everyone craves answers. Readers tell us that their workers are particularly anxious about their job security and financial future.

Listen to worried workers

January 1, 2009
When times get tough, it’s tempting to retreat behind closed doors. But that’s hardly reassuring to your employees. Beware of reacting to uncertain economic conditions by hunkering down and lowering your visibility at work.

Does it pay to contradict people?

January 1, 2009
When you inform people that they’re wrong, you risk alienating them. Even if your intent is to help them gain accurate information or prevent misunderstanding, your attempt to correct them can come across as an aggressive act.

Learn to love stories

January 1, 2009
The next time a colleague launches into an anecdote, resist the urge to start daydreaming. By listening patiently to a long-winded storyteller, you build rapport.

Combat jitters with gestures

January 1, 2009
The nervousness that you feel when you’re about to deliver a speech need not hamper your style. In fact, the way you respond can either mitigate your jitters or make them worse.

Here’s to safety and sobriety

December 1, 2008
The federal government has designated December as National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month in an attempt to raise awareness that an alcohol-related car crash kills someone every 31 minutes.

Cite numbers that come alive

December 1, 2008
If you know your topic inside out, your knowledge can work against you when you deliver a presentation. You may spout statistics with ease—and put people to sleep.