Communication

Adjust your style–or else

September 1, 2009
You like to speak bluntly. By leveling with people, you find it helps you get along with them. But what works in most cases may not appeal to everyone.

Seek forgiveness, start afresh

September 1, 2009
At sundown on Sept. 18, the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah begins. Ten days later comes Yom Kippur. This period represents a time for Jews to reflect on and repent for their wrongs. Regardless of your faith, September marks a good time to seek forgiveness from people in your workplace whom you have mistreated.

Rebound decisively in the aftermath of a skirmish

September 1, 2009
Some conflicts are beyond your control. But you can always decide how to respond.

Plug the execution gap

August 1, 2009
You repeatedly articulate goals and point workers in the right direction. They know what’s at stake and they understand your vision. They just don’t know what to do next. Beware of communicating on a macro level.

Gain credibility so that your words matter

August 1, 2009
When employees perceive you as credible, they trust you. Your promises and reassurances resonate with them.

Express ideas that shine

August 1, 2009
In an ideal world, you would state your idea and others would evaluate it purely on its merits. In reality, that almost never happens.

Evade questions by lobbing them back

July 1, 2009
Just because someone asks you a question doesn’t oblige you to answer it. Managers often prefer to evade an inquiry or dig for more information before responding to it.

Move beyond boring blather

July 1, 2009
It’s easy to spot boring speakers. They start by stating the obvious. Then they spout generalities. And they conclude by restating the obvious.

Back off from bossiness

July 1, 2009
When John Shiely became chief executive of Briggs & Stratton Corp. in 2001, he learned to modulate his communication style. Instead of telling staffers what he wanted, he asked questions and listened without interrupting.

Too much talk, too little action

July 1, 2009
Management gurus often urge team leaders to engage in open, free-flowing communication with their workgroups. But some managers go too far.